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Sweet Life diabetes community blog.

Do you know the 5 symptoms of diabetes?

This National Diabetes Month, our focus is simple: sharing the 5 symptoms of diabetes throughout South Africa. That’s what the Know Diabetes movement is all about. Did you know that half of all people with diabetes in South Africa are undiagnosed? We can change that by sharing these symptoms with everyone we know – family and friends – and asking them to share.

Getting your blood sugar checked is quick and simple – the results are immediate and it only takes 5 minutes. Please encourage everyone you know to get their blood sugar checked every year!

test your blood sugar

Easy tips for healthier eating

The festive season is nearly upon us! But never fear, we’ve asked Leanne Kiezer, the dietician at Pick n Pay, for some helpful tips for healthier eating during the holidays. It can be really tempting to throw good meal choices out the window when the temptations of the festive season roll round, but unfortunately your diabetes doesn’t take a holiday… Here are a few helpful suggestions for eating healthy without feeling like you’re missing out on all the treats!

Make healthier choices when eating out

 

Eating out does not have to sabotage your focus on healthy eating. Use these tips to keep you on track:

Build healthier meals

 

You can reduce the amount of fat, sugar and salt in a recipe without compromising on taste by using healthy substitutes:

Fat: For baked goods, use half the butter, margarine or oil suggested in the recipe and replace the other half with apple sauce or mashed banana.

Sugar: In most recipes, you can reduce sugar by a third to a half. Add spices like cinnamon, cloves, allspice and nutmeg or flavourings like vanilla and almond essence to enhance sweetness.

Sodium: Reduce salt by one-half in baked goods that don’t require yeast. For foods that do require yeast, don’t reduce the amount of salt as it is necessary for leavening.

Healthy substitutes

 

Healthy substitutes not only reduce the amount of fat, energy and sodium in your recipes, but can also boost the nutritional content.

Get more great advice on healthy eating by visiting Pick n Pay’s Health Corner, calling Leanne on 0800 11 22 88 or emailing healthhotline@pnp.co.za.

 

 

156% rise in diabetes: what’s the answer?

The 2nd annual Diabetes Frontier Africa conference is in Johannesburg this week, and has some big questions to answer. Medical researchers continue to highlight the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes on our healthcare infrastructure. Due to a lack of current prevalence data and worryingly low rates of diagnosis in sub-Saharan Africa, it is expected that the International Diabetes Federation projected 156% rise in the disease could well be short of the eventual reality.

How to educate the public about diabetes

 

In an effort to avoid this worrying outcome; government, medical professionals and social influencers will meet in November to discuss ways to educate the public and mitigate many of the challenges South Africa faces in dealing with diabetes. Diabetes advocates including Sophie Ndaba-Lichaba (entrepreneur and actress) and representatives from Gauteng MEC for Health, Gwendoline Malegwale Ramokgopa’s department will join global medical professionals at the 2nd annual Diabetes Frontier Africa conference. Key on the agenda will be the issue of developing societal shifts in SA to help alleviate the challenges of scarce resources in fighting diabetes.

Limited medical resources

 

Due to a myriad of medical complications, including organ failure, loss of sight and limbs as well as sexual dysfunction, diabetes casts a wide shadow of burden on already limited medical resources. This is especially problematic in low income and rural areas with limited medical staff and beds to deal with the supportive care needed to deal with diabetic complications. Complications which could be largely managed through a consistent and widespread campaign of awareness to fight myths and stigma in these communities.

The stigma around diabetes is particularly complex in SA as patients are not only judged for falling sick or becoming obese, but also for taking their treatment seriously. Insulin injections, exercise, maintaining a strict diet and weight-loss have all been linked with negative social response in many of the communities worst affected by the disease.

Diabetes advocacy

 

Recently, diabetes advocate Sophie Lichaba was at the centre of body shaming attacks directed to her and husband, businessman Max Lichaba on social media. Attacks that laid bare the very real problem of SA society assuming that obesity is a sign of affluence while weight-loss is an indication of terminal illness and bad lifestyle choices.

The expert panel led by top London-based researcher, Dr Louise Goff will join Lichaba to discuss challenges and strategies in citizen advocacy at the event that coincides with World Diabetes Day (14 November). Dr Goff’s research focuses on how ethnicity impacts on the pathophysiological development of Type 2 diabetes. Her research team are working on culturally-tailored self- management programmes for diabetes.

The role of technology and data science will also be highlighted with Dr Vukosi Marivate from the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research and Mr Norman Moyo from Cumii Technologies expected to discuss ways that professionals and caregivers can leverage emerging technologies to help with diabetes care.

Diabetes conference line-up

 

Here’s the entire line-up of impressive names in diabetes:

Join global endocrinology researchers, nutrition experts, policy makers and top medical journalists for networking and collaboration in fighting this growing epidemic.

Conference chairperson: Dr Sundeep Ruder (Clinical Endocrinologist, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital; Lecturer, University of the Witwatersrand)

Speakers for the event include the following top experts:

Dr Bongi Ngema Zuma (Former 1st Lady of RSA and CEO – Bongi Ngema-Zuma Foundation)

Dr Gwendoline Malegwale Ramokgopa (MEC – Gauteng Department of Health)

Dr Louise Goff (Senior Researcher, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences Division Kings College London)

Dr Bo Liu (Researcher, Diabetes Research Group Kings College London)

Dr Chibuzo Anaso (Diabetologist, Western Cape Department of Health and CEO Anaso Diabetes Foundation)

Mr Norman Moyo (Chief Executive Officer, Cumii Technologies – a subsidiary of Econet Group)

Dr Vukosi Marivate (ABSA Chair of Data, University of Pretoria and Senior Researcher, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research [CSIR])

Sophie Ndaba-Lichaba (Entrepreneur, Actress, Diabetes advocate)

Dr Charlotte Boughton (Clinical Researcher, University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories)

Book your tickets to the event here!

 

Photo by Antenna on Unsplash

Diabetes Awareness Wellness Day: Athlone

What are you doing on Saturday 3rd November? Why not join WoW (WesternCape on Wellness) in Athlone for a fun and informative Diabetes Awareness Day?

It’s a free event, with a family walk and various events throughout the day… See below from Joan Leukus of the Athlone Lions Club, one of the organisers.

Why is a Diabetes Awareness Day necessary?

 

This is indeed very humbling to talk about this event that is aimed at raising awareness about diabetes which is reaching epidemic proportions in adults and children. Gaining and retaining a state of wellness is also a very essential aspect of good living.

As a recently diagnosed diabetic, l have made the conscious choice to embark on this diabetes and wellness journey on Saturday 3rd November at Nantes Park in the midst of The Silvertown – Bridgetown residential area.

The focus is on:

  • Experiential learning, listening, experiencing – questioning – tasting, and most importantly, thinking about changes of attitude and action.
  • Making good, healthy, informed changes, for daily living that will improve your shopping list; your medical bills; your confidence levels; heart health, as well as your state of mind.
  • The outcome of all of this will be a healthier happier you, with more positive goals in mind.

Activities on the day

 

Throughout this planning, my hope was to engage and bring onboard people with experience and enthusiasm to make this event a lively, interactive learning hub of activities for young and old.

  • Laughter is so therapeutic. There will be lots of that in between the seriousness of screening and testing for blood sugar; blood pressure and BMl. It’s important to know your numbers.
  • Follow up services for support will also be provided by our local clinic and day hospital as well as our local pharmicist Abdullah Khan, owner of Athlone Pharmacy, also the founder and sponsor of Diabetic 101 who spearheads regular educational programmes and walking events to support diabetics and their families.
  • I’m so privileged to be flanked by two superfit hunks: Bradley and Nathan. Bradley Bailey is a WoW! Champion and founder of Perfect Fit 360. Nathan brings the roof down daily as he takes the teams through their paces.
  • They will set the tone of the day, amidst healthy foods and various diabetic friendly items on sale. With many kids activities and storytelling.
  • Virgin Active will ensure we keep up the pace with mini fit challenges.
  • These all follow after a focussed guest speaker broadens our horizons about diabetes. Our overall experience will increase our understanding about wellness on many levels. We are fortunate to have a health official that brings us this important message. I trust that it will boost our level of self-care.
  • Pampering sessions will be available at a small fee.
  • We will also have nutrition, loads of raffles, games and news about community support groups as well as news about the Athlone Lions Club.

Our programme will roll out in the vicinity of the arena and is best accessible via the main gate, in Appledene Road, where our local neighbourhood watch will be in attendance. The event will be supported by a variety of health promoting ideas for education and improved networking.

 

Travelling with diabetes: 8 helpful tips

Today, our guest writer Maryna shares some tips and advice from her travels… Specifically, travelling with diabetes. She’s outlined 8 helpful tips for travelling with diabetes. Do you have anything to add? Comment below, or on Facebook!

travelling with diabetes

Adventures with diabetes

 

I love travelling. 
I’ve travelled overseas, I’ve travelled to remote places in the country with no facilities, I go camping a lot – especially in summer. I love seeing new places, meeting new people and just basking in a foreign sun. Insulin and glucometer in tow, I’ve spent ten days in the middle of the Karoo without electricity or running water. It wasn’t an easy task and required a lot of planning on my part, but it’s an experience I wouldn’t exchange for anything.

Going on holiday should be an exciting adventure filled with laughter and fun. Unfortunately, if you have diabetes it comes with its own set of troubles. Besides that annoying feeling that you forgot half of what you should have packed, you have a few extra factors to consider when packing that suitcase.

Easier to travel with diabetes now

 

Travelling as a diabetic has become much easier than it used to be. In 2002 when I went to the UK for the first time, I was still using syringes and vials and the ensuing three-hour debacle at customs left me crying and embarrassed in a busy corridor in the middle of Heathrow Airport. I had a doctor’s letter, I had a letter from the medical aid, but trying to get boxes of syringes over the border ended up being far more difficult than expected.

In 2018, Customs isn’t a worry anymore, in most cases authorities don’t even notice the pens in my hand luggage and when I declare my medicine, most flight attendees are too scared to take my insulin away from me and keep it in the cabin like they are supposed to. I don’t really need a doctor’s letter anymore since it’s now a rarity to be asked for one, and even the strictest airports don’t seem to bat an eyelid at my luggage.

There are a few tricks to making your travel experience as easy as possible. Here are my top eight tips for travelling with diabetes:

1. Travelling with insulin

 

Firstly and most important comes the insulin. The ins and outs of travelling with insulin can be a bit tricky, especially keeping your insulin cold enough. My solution came from the fitness industry: www.sixpackbags.com. These bags are made for bodybuilders to keep and carry their eight meals of the day. The bags are sneakily lined with small pockets for ice-packs, you can line the whole bag with icy goodness, and the bags are insulated very similarly to a coolerbox. It’s saved my insulin on numerous occasions, especially during long-haul flights or long road trips.

Always remember to take extra insulin! This I learnt long ago when I went on a sandy beach vacation. I never considered that sea sand is fine enough to slip between the seals in my epipen, which in turn makes the pen useless as it can’t turn anymore. 
Lesson learnt! The panic was very real and only after a whole day of going from pharmacy to pharmacy and eventually the hospital, was my problem solved… At a price. Always take extra needles with you and keep a doctor’s letter on you for overseas trips to satiate that one-in-a-thousand strict Customs employee.

2. Remember your water bottle

 

Secondly is water, always have water with you. It doesn’t matter if it’s an eight hour drive, 12 hour flight or a leisurely stroll on the beach. Water is a great way to help your insulin do its work. Since diabetics dehydrate faster than the norm, it’s important to have your liquid backup prepared.

3. Watch what you eat

 

Take into account that sitting for prolonged hours is most probably throwing off your daily routine, so check what you eat and drink while travelling. I usually eat far less while on the road or on a flight or I’ll pay the price later with a high blood sugar reading. Once you arrive, it’s important to watch what you eat as well – especially when you travel overseas. Foreign food is one of the best things when travelling, I love tasting new dishes and experiencing local food customs, but don’t be shy to ask what is in your delicious food and how it was made. You’ll regret it later if you ate something that doesn’t play well with your diabetes.

4. Be aware of water retention

 

Holding back water is normal when travelling for long hours. It can be uncomfortable and at times even painful. Personally it affects me for a couple of days when I’ve travelled for long and I’ve had some instances where I would have made balloons jealous with my puffiness. Invest in compression socks, which you can get at any Clicks or Dischem. 
Trust me, the last thing you want is huge “cankles” when you get off the plane, waddling like a duck for the first two days of your holiday.

5. Be (medically) prepared

 

Always make sure that your medical information is readily available. It sounds obvious, but I have been surprised by the amount of people that don’t have any type of indication of their diabetes on their person. Get that MedicAlert bracelet and wear it.

6. Pack carefully

 

Comfortable, worn-in shoes are a must. It doesn’t matter if your holiday includes a lot of walking or not, make sure those sensitive feet are comfortable. Combined with the water retention that you may experience, you might have less feeling in your feet, so make sure to check your feet more regularly, especially for blisters.
 In the last couple of years I’ve also started covering my lower legs when camping in the veld or places with rough terrain. The last thing you want is scratches and scrapes on your legs.

7. Test your blood sugar more often

 

This is not a must, but I find that my routine is completely topsy-turvy on holiday. I eat differently, my activities are different, sleeping patterns are strange, so I test my blood sugar more often. I carry my glucometer on me at all times during my trips. Depending on how sensitive your body is, even a slight difference can affect you. So listen to your body and make sure you are always ready for highs or lows or just a crazy surprise sunburn.

8. Enjoy yourself!

 

Possibly one of the most valuable tips I can give here is to enjoy yourself. If you are prepared, there is nothing stopping you from having a fun-filled, adventurous experience. Be vigilant, but not obsessive about your condition. Enjoy the sites, smells and surroundings, meet new people, experience something different. Travelling is an enriching experience, make sure you get as much as you can from it!

It sounds like a lot of effort, many things to remember and just a plain inconvenience, but trust me: being prepared will make your holiday and travelling so much more pleasant.

 

Parenting a child with diabetes

There’s been a lot of talk on our Facebook page about how diabetes affects the whole family. Especially after this guest article about how Diabetes destroyed my relationship with my mother. Today, we have the other side of the story to tell – a mother’s story of parenting a child with diabetes.

type 1 diabetes

Before diabetes

 

The World Cup Soccer was upon us! The atmosphere was abuzz with all the excitement and schools were closing for holidays. My girls were gearing up for a slumber party to celebrate Kirsten’s 16th birthday, great excitement filled the house as friends arrived present laden and ready for a night of storytelling and fun after an evening at the fan walk.

I asked her not to sleep near two girls who had a cold as it was a long holiday and I didn’t want her to get sick. The party came and went and Kirsten got the dreaded cold. She left two days later to go and spend time in Elgin with a few close friends and when she arrived home with bronchitis was put on antibiotics. She was looking very pale and her loss of weight was almost shocking. The doctor seemed concerned at the time but said we could go away and to see him on our return.

Langebaan was like a breath of fresh air compared to the madness in Cape Town and we were looking forward to a couple of days rest with good friends. Kirsten crawled into bed and did not move. We spent days trying to get her to eat to no avail and then she started vomiting: something was wrong and we could all see it. The chemist said there was a bad virus going around and she stuck to fluids for a couple of days: Energade, Powerade and naartjies were her only input.

The scariest day of my life

 

I could see that there was something drastically wrong on the Sunday night – it was as if she was not registering my presence, her knees had swollen to the size of rugby balls, her movement was staggered and she looked like a skeleton with skin on. I could not sleep worrying about what was happening to my beautiful daughter, was it what I had feared the most?

The morning came and with it came the scariest day of my life. I went down to check on her and she was semi-comatose. We threw everything into the back of the car and got back to the doctor in Cape Town in record time with her passing in and out of consciousness. I ran into the doctor and I said what I had been dreading to say: “I think she has diabetes!” Tests were run and confirmation came through two hours later: Kirsten was a Type 1 diabetic, her HBA1C registered as her being one for at least 3 months prior to diagnosis and she was immediately started on insulin. A new chapter in our lives had begun.

Let me just add here that on my husband’s side of the family diabetes was prevalent and I had always had a fear that my children would one day be diagnosed. I had constantly had them checked throughout their childhood. I thought by now they were all safe from this terrible burden.

Days filled with diabetes

 

Our days were filled with diabetes: from doctors to specialists to diabetic educators and reps, it was like a neverending story and a huge overload of information. Could the doctors be wrong? What if it was the energy drinks and naartjies we had given her that had sent her sugars over the top? Could she wake up next week and be fine? “No” was the answer to all our questions and we had to resolve ourselves to the fact that all of our lives were forever going to revolve around diabetes.

Kirsten would have to inject herself three times a day at mealtimes and once before bedtime for the rest of her life. Our days of running into the shops turned into hours reading every label and checking the carb count. All temptations were banished from the house, no more fast foods, as we started our new journey.

Unfortunately for Kirsten, things just did not seem to want to come right. She had lost 11 kilograms and had no muscle on her at all, her BMI was only 16. She could only manage to grab a millimeter of skin to inject but her blood sugar levels were fantastic and her endocrinologist was very impressed with her management thereof. Despite her levels being fine, she kept getting recurring lameness in her legs (from walking the one moment to waking up lame the next), as well as severe neck pains and constant chest infections. We had to forbid anyone near her who was even remotely sick.

At the beginning of December we were thrown into shock as she woke up with a mass of glands on either side of her groin, she was scanned and the glands were in excess of 3cm each so it looked like a bunch of grapes. We anxiously waited as they ruled out lymphoma, but praise be to God, it was not so, and she was blasted with antibiotics to reduce the glands.

Complications of diabetes

 

Our annual holiday to Plett arrived and everyone was so eager and happy to get there, days filled with friends and relaxation and just time to forget about the negatives of the past six months. We enjoyed the first week without a hitch and then once again Kirsten fell ill: she could not eat anything which was most frustrating as diabetics have to eat, and we landed up in the hospital where they could not find anything wrong. Two days later she could not even drink without crying and when her breathing became difficult we once again packed up everything and raced back to the doctors who knew her history in Cape Town.

She can’t recall at all how she got back home, she had lost all the weight we had painfully tried to put onto her and she was admitted for an esophagogastroduodenoscopy showing she had picked up a viral infection which had left her with hundreds of ulcers from the mouth down into her stomach, another complication of diabetes. Once again, loads of meds and a struggle to get her to put on the weight which she desperately needed to gain her strength.

Friends were understanding and eager to learn how to deal with her should her levels drop and were a constant by her side throughout. My frustration was immense, I was so mad at the world, at my Creator, for allowing this to happen to my once super-healthy and fit daughter who had the world at her feet. How could this be happening and why could I not fix it?

child with diabetesMothering a child with diabetes

 

I battled every day to put on a smiling face so that she could not see my worry, I would spend hours sitting in her room at the dead of night praying and watching her just to make sure she did not slip into a coma, I had prayer circles going all over the world for my girl and yet no answers were coming. I realized that God had placed my son (who has Aspergers) in our care because he thought that we could deal with it. He had now obviously decided that we did that job well as Kirsten’s sickness had to be dealt with by us too.

I felt that somehow, somewhere, I had to find the inner strength to show Kirsten that she was still the beautiful daughter I always had, except now she was more special as now it meant that we would have to care for her daily, in all walks of her life. I prayed for the strength to guide me to help her in every way that I could: my shoulders are broad and would surely bear the load.

Not a day goes by that I don’t wonder what her levels are, what she is eating or how she is feeling, if she is not with me it takes everything in my being not to reach for the phone to check. The expense of the last years has been immense, but being her constant carer and companion throughout this ordeal has changed me for the better.

Diabetes brought us closer

 

We are aware of everything that we eat. This is usually the stage in a teenager’s life that they tend to drift away from the parents, but we have become more united. I still allow her freedom but help by providing pre-packed meals knowing that she can enjoy herself without having to worry about where her next meal is coming from. As a family, we have always been close but this disease has brought us closer. We are always on the lookout and we stand together and work through it so that she feels that she is never alone in this lifetime fight with diabetes. We take a small step each day learning and knowing more. Her smile is constant even through all her worries and ill health and this keeps us going.

My daily thoughts revolve around Kirsten and my prayer is for a cure for diabetes to help, not only my daughter, but the millions of people living with diabetes all over the world.

– Sue

PS: Kirsten is now a successful mountain climber and blogger – follow her adventures on Instagram: cape_town_adventurer

 

How to cope with work stress (and diabetes)

Our regular guest writer Maryna has some advice to share today about work stress and diabetes. How do you cope with work stress? Maryna shares some helpful tips that have made it easier for her to stay calm.

work stress and diabetes

Stress and diabetes

 

Life is stressful. In my experience, diabetes and stress don’t play well together.

There are many factors that cause stress, some of them we have no control over, but other factors we can control. Personally, work life is my largest source of a clenched stomach, short breath and continual headaches. Gone are the days when loyalty and hard work paid off: this utopia that my parents so often talk about, I have never encountered.

In my youthful ignorance I chose to pursue a career in advertising. Now, I can’t speak for other industries. But I’ve certainly spent my last fifteen years working eighteen hour days, sleeping badly, drinking too much coffee, fighting stomach ulcers and being guilted into working weekends and holidays.

Constant work pressure

 

Rising up the ranks didn’t make things any easier, as the work and hours didn’t get any less, but the pressure and stress multiplied exponentially.
Don’t misunderstand me: I love what I do and I’m good at it. Most of my fellow creatives are amazing, brilliant people and the fact that I can wear what I want to work is a massive plus in my eyes! I’ve achieved what many others in the industry never do and enjoyed a career that has given me many opportunities to grow, but what did I sacrifice in the process?

It’s difficult coping in these high stress, high output environments, both physically and mentally. Adding diabetes to the already toxic mix makes it even harder. Looking back at the last couple of years, I can’t say that I would do everything over again and not regret it. My body and soul have taken a beating in so many ways and I certainly have the scars and stories to prove it.

Stress coping mechanisms (for a diabetic)

 

How do you cope in this crazy stressful world as a diabetic?

It’s taken me many years to learn this, but firstly: come to terms with your condition. I have this innate drive to not admit that anything is wrong with me. I spent years thinking that my diabetes was a weakness. Many of the things that my co-workers do effortlessly leave me in a near catatonic state for days. I have to sleep, I have to eat, some days I’m exhausted beyond measure, I get headaches, my ankles swell up, the list goes on and on, but it doesn’t make me a lesser employee.

Yes, I have issues, just like every other person around me. You have nothing to prove if you work at your best and deliver good work.

The secret here is that you can’t work your best if you feel like a half-asleep zombie all the time, and that’s a message that needs to come across to your superiors. Don’t let anyone guilt you into over-stretching yourself, don’t let anyone tell you that your diabetes is a problem. You can be just as productive as anyone else if you are responsible and give your body what it needs.

Be responsible for your diabetes

 

That brings us to point number two: be responsible. You, and only you, know your limits, and it’s different for all of us. Say STOP when you need it, and if your boss has a problem with that, then he’s most probably not a very good boss.

Look after your well-being, not only physically but mentally, I have found that your mental health has a lot more to do with healthy blood sugar levels than we are led to believe.

I am a strong believer in meditation and it has helped me to control my raging stress and emotions over time. This might not be true for you, it could something as simple as going to the gym every day or as complex as building a ten thousand piece puzzle.  Find that thing that makes you calm. Find the space that gives you time to contemplate, analyse and solve your problems.

Educate others about diabetes

Thirdly: make sure those closest to you at work can recognise the signs when you lose the plot. Over the years I have become a master in casually talking about my diabetes, not in an aggressive or “feel sorry for me” way, just a casual chat.  Educate those around you about your symptoms. I’ve found that at times I get so distracted by my work or a specific problem, that I don’t notice what my body is telling me. We’ve all had that unpleasant surprise hypo, that sneaks up from behind and leaves you a blubbering, confused mess.

Fortunately, or rather unfortunately for those around me, I turn into the proverbial bear with a thorn in its paw, so it’s obvious when my blood sugar is on the low side. Always make sure that there is at least one person who can recognise the signs and make you aware of them before you get into trouble.

Know yourself

 

Lastly: if your gut is telling you something is wrong, there’s most probably something wrong. Go to the doctor if you feel anything odd is going on in your body. Stress does strange things to you: I’ve had everything, from odd circular dry patches on my skin to a septic ulcer that landed me in hospital with a sugar count of 48 mmol/L and a near-death experience. Needless to say, that experience taught me that you can never be too careful or vigilant when it comes to your diabetes.

Our bodies tend to react a lot more violently to issues that most non-diabetic people just brush off as nothing. Learn to know your body and how it reacts to different situations.

There is no right or wrong way to deal with stress. Be aware of what your body is telling you and take responsibility for that. Learn what helps you deal with your circumstances and practice that. Don’t be afraid to stand your ground and defend your own health. Care for yourself and your work will surely flourish.

– Maryna

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

Life with a Type 1 diabetic husband

Ever wondered what it’s like to be on the other side of diabetes – the partner of someone with diabetes? Here at Sweet Life, we’ve always thought it’s such an important (and under-appreciated) part of living with diabetes. That’s why we have a whole series of Partner’s Corner articles: for the husbands and wives, the moms and dads, the friends and colleagues of people living with diabetes.

 
Victoria wrote to me last week with this glimpse of life with a Type 1 diabetic husband…
 

type 1 diabetic husband

 

We got married at a very young age, maybe because we felt we living on borrowed time. Everything you think marriage entails is amplified when everyday is a fight against a mountain of testing, insulin, highs and lows. Waking up in the middle of the night, placing your hand on him to make sure he is still breathing and okay. 2am and 4.30am testing sugars… Rushing to get something to eat to prevent that low.

 

Every doctor’s visit you hold your breath, getting the bad news that his kidneys are failing and his high blood pressure medicine is basically killing him. In and out of hospital trying these pill, trying those pills. Eating no meat for months to help the kidneys build back up.

 

Looking at this wonderful man that will argue with you to give the homeless man the bread he asked for while busy going into DKA, keeping him awake and alert while rushing him to hospital. What did he do to deserve this?

 

Worrying about him 24/7 and then even more. He loves so fully and laughs so loud. He lives despite everything this disease has thrown at him.

 

When you’re young, you dream of getting married, having kids and this amazing wonderful life, but sometimes God has another plan for you and things you wanted aren’t in the books. But I would for sure not trade anything.

 

He is my always and forever.

 

– Victoria

 

 

Diabetic-friendly foods with iron?

Brian has a question I haven’t heard before… Any advice?

I am a Type 2 diabetic and just recently I broke my hand in a freak accident.

To cut a long story short, the blood tests showed that I have a serious iron deficiency and I’m on a course of iron and Vitamin C supplements.

My question is: what foods contain iron that I can add to my diet?

Thanks!
– Brian

Sweet Life named one of the best diabetes magazines online!

Diabetes Magazines

Last week, we were informed that Sweet Life has been named one of The Best Diabetes Magazines in the world. We are absolutely delighted – and honoured – to have been chosen from thousands of diabetes magazines on the web. Feedspot uses search and social metrics to rank the top 10 diabetes magazines based on the following criteria:

  • Google reputation and Google search ranking
  • Influence and popularity on Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites
  • Quality and consistency of posts
  • Feedspot’s editorial team and expert review

We’re in great company, including:
Diabetes Forecast
A Sweet Life
Diabetes Health
Diabetic Gourmet magazine
Diabetes Voice

Be sure to follow these blogs for more great diabetes information!

 

What is diabetes burnout?

diabetes burnout

“Diabetes…. Uugh.” That feeling pretty much sums up what diabetes burnout is all about: the feeling that it’s too exhausting / frustrating / unpredictable / impossible to manage your diabetes, so why even try? Diabetes burnout is common in people with diabetes (both Type 1 and Type 2) and for good reason – it’s a chronic condition. Chronic as in forever, never giving you a break, never giving you a holiday, never giving you a moment’s rest. Add to that the fact that diabetes is an ever-changing condition, with blood sugar fluctuating depending on everything from your diet and exercise to hormones, weather, sickness and more, and it’s no surprise that people with diabetes sometimes feel exhausted by it all.

When you need to worry about diabetes burnout

“Diabetes burnout is a normal emotion for diabetics to feel at any given time,” explains Gabi Richter, a Type 1 diabetic and counsellor in Cape Town. “It occurs when you are fed up with the routine and lifestyle that being diabetic entails, and you just want to forget it all. This is fine to feel once in a while – and can even be healthy to some point. But it needs attention when the feeling stays for a long time and your routine diabetes care stops.”

This, of course, is the warning sign. If it feels like there’s no point taking care of your diabetes because you have no control any more, that’s when you stop paying attention to food and medication and self-care. And that’s when blood sugar levels can get wildly out of control. Extended periods of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) lead to diabetes complications, and in Type 1 diabetics, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can be extremely dangerous.

So what do you do if you’re experiencing diabetes burnout? Reach out. Connect. Realise you’re not alone. “Diabetes burnout is a very real issue for all the people I am privileged to educate and spend time with,” explains Kate Bristow, a diabetes specialist nurse in Pietermaritzburg, KZN. 
It’s a combination of the frustration of things: Never having a day off from diabetes. The guilt of not sticking to the right eating plan or forgetting to take medication or check blood sugar. The relentlessness of never being able to take time off from managing diabetes. “Burnout is often accompanied by stress and anxiety and sometimes depression or guilt – all negative emotions,” says Kate.

5 tips for diabetes burnout

Here are 5 pieces of advice Kate Bristow offers her patients.

  1. Share
    Share your frustrations with someone – a family member, or diabetes nurse or educator.  See if there are ways to decrease your burden for a while.
  2. Cook
    Try new diabetic-friendly recipes – a change is as good as a holiday.
  3. Breathe
    Try practicing mindfulness – a practice based on learning to become aware of how you are feeling emotionally in a non-judgemental way.  It has been found to be effective in supporting diabetes management and the general stress of everyday life. Eating mindfully has been shown to improve diabetes control.
  4. Unwind
    Life is busy – stress is a way of life – defined as a state of emotional tension elicited by the pressure of everyday life. Diabetes is probably only one of those stresses. Exercise has been shown to reduce stress levels and alleviate depression as much as some medications used for the same purpose. Exercise is also good for our physical health – blood pressure, weight, cholesterol, and diabetes.  So perhaps another way of dealing with burnout is to get an accountability exercise partner and start getting physical at least 3 times a week (even if it’s only for 20 minutes at a go, or at work).
  5. Ask
    If you really feel like you are not coping – ask for help. This is why you have a health care team and a diabetes community. Ask your doctor, your diabetes educator, your diabetic community. You’re not alone in this.

Diabetes burnout is a reality for many of us with diabetes, but it doesn’t have to be a long-term reality. With the right help and care, it can be a phase we move through – just another part of living with this chronic condition. How do you cope with diabetes burnout? Do you have any tips to share?

 

Thriving after a Type 1 diabetes diagnosis

inspiring diabetes storyMeet Michael Marnewick, a Type 1 diabetic and active member of the Diabetic South Africans community. Michael has an inspiring take on living with diabetes, and shares some of his advice here. He’s also the author of a new book: “Coach: The life and soccer times of Clive Barker.”

Although diabetes has the potential to be life threatening if not managed well, it also has the potential to create better awareness about our bodies and our health. I accept that I have a condition but I do (almost) everything I can to live a life free from fear. But ultimately a combination of diet (first and foremost), regular physical activity, a wonderful endocrinologist and my awesome diabetic nurse (Fiona Prins), the fear of the consequences of not managing it properly and the willpower to follow a lifestyle that works for me is what keeps me positive.”

What was your diabetes diagnosis like?

I was quite unaware of my so-called ill-health when I went for a routine test and my blood sugar was in the mid-teens. I put it down to the coke and chocolate I had enjoyed earlier. The frequent night visits to the loo were explained away with advancing age (early 40s). In short, I was in complete denial.

Do you know many other people with diabetes?

I don’t know many, but my brother was diagnosed Type 1 diabetic some years ago following a massive trauma (shrapnel through the brain while on active service duty for the SADF in 1986). So, while there might be a genetic link, both of us had trauma that may have had a hand in this. For me, it was a sedentary lifestyle, bad eating habits and the stress of divorce that led to the diagnosis in 2012 – six years ago.

When (and why) did you change your diet?

When I posted something on Facebook about it, my GP called me up and suggested I look into the low carb, high fat lifestyle. I don’t call it a diet, because it isn’t a short-term intervention. So I’ve been living the low carb lifestyle for about six years. Initially I lost about 8kgs and dropped to a low of 55kgs (I am 1.7m tall). A year ago I went for a health check and with persistently high and uncontrolled BG ranging from 6 – 18 (and a high of 27), was hospitalised. My initial diagnosis in 2012 proved to be incorrect, I was not Type II but Type 1 (Actually, Type 1.5 – LADA which is Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults). My endocrinologist gave me the diagnosis and since working with her and my diabetic nurse, my HBA1C has improved every four months since then.

Could you tell us a typical day’s food?

Typically I wake up at 5am for work and eat breakfast at 9am. Generally I’ll eat some bacon, two eggs, half an avo, cream cheese or other cheese, and some leftover cheesy roasted veg. Lunch is a smoothie at about 2pm. Double cream Greek yoghurt with added cream, chia seeds (soaked in water first), frozen strawberries, almond nut butter, cinnaon and ice. Dinner at about 6.30pm will be roast / pork rashers / chicken dish / curry / zoodles (zuccini noodles or konjac root noodles) with a creamy sauce and bacon or salami / generally with veg. If I eat out, it will be mostly chicken with veg or salad.

What exercise do you do?

I do a lot of physical exercise – when time affords. Some parkrun or else a jog, mountain biking action cricket in season, swimming, badminton, tennis, gym. I am also outside and on my feet most days, often 12-18 000 steps worth.

How is your health?

My health, despite the diabetes, is probably the best since I was an active teenager. I eat zero sugar, I exercise 3-5 times a week, and I am rarely sick with colds, etc. My TomTom sports watch gives my physical age as 25 (I am currently 49).

What advice do you have for diabetics who are struggling?

My advice is to find a reason to stay healthy. I live an active lifetsyle that I want to continue. I want to walk my daughters down the aisle one day, not from a wheel-chair. My brother has no control because he is in denial and has ended up in comas and in hospital numerous times. My inspiration is not to be like him.

What makes your life sweet?

I try to avoid sweet things as much as possible – as far as substitutes go. Sugar addiction (and it was), is what I believe made me diabetic. But I feel like diabetes has given me a new lease on life. I want to be setting sporting world records in my 80s and I feel strongly that I am in the kind of good health now that will realise that.

Any final advice?

We are all led to believe that the food pyramid is the bible on nutrition when vast numbers of studies are proving the opposite. We’re told to eat carbs for energy, when fat is a much denser fuel but isn’t stored as fat in the cells like glucose is. We’re told to “Eat “healthy” things like fruits, but when fruit juice contains more sugar than coke, something is very wrong. I’ve read the testemonies of sick people who no longer suffer from PCOS, high blood pressure, high blood glucose, and they’re winning the war on obesity.

Hippocrates wrote: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” – how true!

Talking Type 2 diabetes on Expresso

Did you catch Sweet Life editor Bridget McNulty when she returned to the Expresso show on SABC3 to talk about Type 2 diabetes? Here’s an excerpt of the interview in case you didn’t… Watch Bridget try to remember everything she can about Type 2 diabetes, on air!

The interview covers the causes of Type 2 diabetes, who is most at risk and why, the symptoms of Type 2 diabetes to look out for, and what food to eat to help combat Type 2 diabetes. Check out the previous interview here.

Prefer reading? Here’s an excerpt of the interview:

1. What causes Type 2 Diabetes?
Although Type 2 diabetes is known as a lifestyle disease, which means that poor lifestyle choices cause it, there is also a strong genetic component. So if you have family with Type 2 diabetes, you’re more likely to get it – it can be hereditary. There’s not much you can do about that but there’s a lot you can do about your lifestyle.

Poor lifestyle choices like eating a lot of processed, sugary, fatty foods (junk food, essentially) and not exercising, smoking and drinking too much all elevate your risk of Type 2 diabetes developing. Being overweight is also a risk factor, especially fat around the middle. These all lead to insulin resistance, which means your body can’t process insulin properly. This is one of the main causes of Type 2 diabetes. The other cause is when your body doesn’t make enough insulin.

2. Who is most at risk and why?
People who lead a sedentary lifestyle – not exercising – and making bad food choices – too much sugary, processed food. White bread, white rice, pasta, chips, chocolates, pies, sweets, cooldrinks – all the delicious stuff that’s bad for you.

3. What are the symptoms to look out for?
There are 5 common symptoms of diabetes: extreme thirst, extreme hunger, needing to pee a lot (especially at night), exhaustion and blurry vision. If you have any of these symptoms you should get a fingerprick blood test – it takes less than 5 minutes at your local clinic or pharmacy and will tell you if you’re at risk of developing diabetes.

4. Nutrition-wise, which types of foods can help combat type 2 Diabetes?
All the healthy stuff! High fibre, whole foods. Fresh fruit in moderation, loads of vegetables, some good carbs that are low GI and high fibre, good quality protein. No junk food, no cooldrinks, no cakes, sweets, biscuits, chips. If you think of your plate as a circle, half of it should be filled with vegetables or salad, 1/4 with good quality protein (fish, chicken, meat, eggs) and 1/4 with high-fibre carbs, with some good quality fats (like olive oil or avocado). If you’re Banting, this will be a different proportion, but it’s the same idea: good quality, healthy, whole food.

“Diabetes destroyed my relationship with my mother”

I’d like to introduce Maryna Prins, a new contributor who will be sharing her thoughts on living with Type 1 diabetes every month. Would you like to contribute to the Sweet Life diabetes community blog? Send us a mail to share your thoughts with the community!

Diabetes relationships

The one thing that truly bothers me about diabetes

I’ve had Type 1 diabetes for most of my life, 27 years to be exact.

I’m fortunate enough to not have any complications and I’ve never found my diabetes to be a setback or an obstacle in my life. I’ve always taken pride in myself, I’ve faced the world head on and have been quite successful – I’ve achieved many things that my small, terrified ten-year-old self would never have dreamed possible. Everything seems to be pretty good as far as things go, but are they really?

I was sitting in the waiting room at my doctor’s office, bored, and picked up one of the many old magazines that are always associated with the stuffy surroundings of a doctor’s office. It was an older issue of the CDE magazine. I hesitantly flipped through it, too stubborn to admit to myself that I have a condition that affects my life.

Then, there it was. One page that listed do’s and don’ts for parents with diabetic children.

I skimmed through the list, still not willing to fully commit to reading and understanding the words. Then I really read it, and the one thing that truly bothers me about diabetes jumped right from the page into my heart. Diabetes inadvertently destroyed my relationship with my parents, especially my mother.

Do not become obsessed with the diabetes

Sometimes a condition, a disease, whatever you want to call it, brings a family closer together; but at times, the opposite happens.

“Remember that your child is still a human, do not become obsessed with the diabetes.” The quote isn’t exact, but in my head, that’s what it said.

I can distinctly remember myself crying as a young fifteen- or sixteen-year-old, telling my mother that I have feelings, that everything is not always connected to my diabetes. I also had my heart crushed by the handsome, popular boy in class, I also felt the pressure of fitting in and being a “cool kid”, I was a normal teenager, with normal problems. To my mother though, I was a condition, the only thing she was concerned about was my blood sugar levels and why they weren’t perfect. A 6.5 blood sugar level wasn’t good enough, even a 6 wouldn’t do, she wanted a 5.8 and only then would it ever be good enough.

A rollercoaster ride of highs and lows

Now if you’ve gone through puberty as a diabetic, you will know that the war inside your body with a million hormones practically makes a perfect blood sugar reading impossible. Your body does strange things at that age, even if you don’t have a chronic condition. When you add diabetes in the mix, it’s just a rollercoaster ride of highs and lows, most of the time not explainable.

I can’t wholly blame my mother though, it was very different back then.

Diabetes was rare, Type 1 diabetes even rarer, and no-one really knew what it was. The last 30 years have seen a massive leap in our knowledge and treatment of the condition. In 1992, diabetes was practically a death sentence. There were no epipens, the glucometers were larger than bricks and cost a fortune, the tests took ages and weren’t necessarily very accurate, I used a normal syringe and vial for ages before I got my first pen to use. Sugar was the devil, and I came out of my first three months after diagnosis believing that I would go into hyperglycemic shock if I even looked at sugar.

My mother was afraid that I would die. It’s something I only came to understand many years later, and surely not something I can hold against her: she loves me. Her desire was to not let me die, but right there she lost something very valuable: we both lost our relationship as mother and daughter. My mom became my police officer and prison guard, someone that did not care for things like feelings and aspirations, she only cared about that perfect score.

We fought, a lot, and even today I often have to remind my mother that I’m not a disease. I felt like a disease for too long and the silent rebellion that came from that feeling is not something I am proud of.

No matter how hard I tried, I always failed

I started smoking at a very young age, not for the same reason many other teenagers do. Someone once told me that it suppressed your appetite. I’ve always had an appetite like a bear, I’m always hungry. In later years I found out that I have a very fast metabolism and that’s the reason I have an unending hunger, but my 15-year-old self knew nothing about metabolisms and believed that if I could eat less my blood sugar would surely be more controllable. It worked, for about 3 months until I was addicted and it was too late to just stop.

When I realised I could get away with occasionally having sugar, the rebel dial went in the complete opposite direction, and I remember sneaking off to the shop to buy handfuls of sweets and sitting in the large tree in our front yard gorging on chocolates and ice-cream.

I felt isolated and scared a lot of time, terrified of disappointing my mother, terrified of dying or losing a leg. My mother, unknowingly, had threatened me many times with those outcomes. “If your blood sugar is high you will lose a leg.”

Mostly I felt like a failure. I couldn’t live up to the standards that were expected of me and no matter how hard I tried, I always failed. Inadvertently that feeling affected my whole life and I spent years not believing in myself: if I couldn’t do something as easy as control my diabetes, how could I succeed at anything else?

We are all different

It took me years, stubbornness and a lot of growing up to realise that, actually, I can do anything and controlling diabetes is not an easy task with set rules. We are all different, our bodies weren’t created out of a mould and we can’t treat any condition with a mentality like that.

I learnt to understand my mother’s way of showing her love and concern, and that her words were harsh out of love. I mourn the fact that we never built a relationship that so many other mothers and daughters share, we never built trust or a way to communicate that showed that we were interested in each other’s lives.

I hope that other parents with diabetic children will read this article and not make the same mistakes we made. Your child might be diabetic, but that should never overshadow the fact that they are human, with human feelings and experiences, dreams to become more and be their best.

Encourage and praise them for their efforts and never distance yourself from their lives.

 

Photo by Alex Jones on Unsplash

The Cape Town Diabetes SA Children’s Camp

Have you heard about the Cape Town Diabetes SA Children’s Camp? Don’t delay, register today! Here’s all the info you need, from Shelly Schutte, one of the organisers. She posted this on the Diabetic South Africans Facebook page:

The Cape Town Diabetes SA Children’s Camp is now just a few weeks away and we are getting all the preparations in place! It will be held from the 31st of August to the 2nd of September. We have a mix of new and more experienced leaders for the upcoming camp and had a fun training morning on Saturday the 4th of August. All leaders were guided through the programme and given advice and training on how to care for children on camp responsibly while also making sure everyone has fun! Please note we will have a doctor and dietitian at the campsite throughout the weekend.

Diabetes Camp is such a special opportunity for children, teenagers and adults to meet others who just ‘get’ what makes Diabetes both a challenge and a gift. It is also a chance to have lots of fun while learning more about how to manage Diabetes.

If you haven’t got your camp form in yet, please email Margot as soon as possible.
Email: mccumisky.margot@gmail.com

The cutoff for camp forms is the 15th of August. The camp is open for 9-14 year olds and costs just R200. If you are older than 14, you are absolutely welcome to come along but may be asked to assist the leaders in some way.

See you at camp!

Understanding diabetes nutrition

Living with diabetes: Understanding diabetes nutrition

 

healthy diabetes nutrition

Did you know that the dietary guidelines recommended for people with diabetes are the same as those recommended for general health? That means you don’t need to prepare separate meals for yourself at home – your family can simply adopt your healthy habits!

10 helpful tips for a healthy diabetes diet

 

Follow these 10 tips each day to promote a balanced and healthy meal plan to help manage your blood glucose levels:

  1. Eat at least three balanced, regular meals each day, incorporating a variety of different foods.
  2. While your healthy meal plan does allow for a small amount of sugar found naturally in many foods, avoid excess sugar and refined carbohydrates, as these promote poor blood glucose control.
  3. Include small servings of high-fibre carbohydrate foods, such as oats, bran cereals, brown rice, sweet potato, baby potatoes, wholewheat pasta, seed loaf, beans and lentils.
  4. Aim to eat at least three servings of vegetables and two to three servings of fruit every day.
  5. Include a portion of lean protein into each of your meals to help improve blood glucose control.
  6. Lose weight, if necessary. A weight loss of as little as 5 to 10% of your body weight can dramatically improve your blood glucose control.
  7. Cut back on saturated fats, such as butter, chicken skin, high-fat dairy products, fat on meat
    and processed meats, like sausage and boerewors.
  8. Use healthier monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, canola oil, avocado, nuts and peanut butter.
  9. Eat fish, especially oily fish like sardines, pilchards, mackerel and salmon, at least twice a week.
  10. Use salt sparingly, as excessive salt intake can lead to high blood pressure and heart disease.

Not sure what meal plan to follow? You can consult with a registered dietitian to compile an individualised meal plan specific to your needs, taking into account your food preferences, level of physical activity and lifestyle.

Eating for diabetes

 

Here’s a helpful guideline to illustrate what a balanced meal should look like, and how to divide up your plate. Aim for 1/4 plate high-fibre carbohydrates, 1/4 plate good quality proteins and 1/2 plate vegetables. Eat fruit in moderation, small amounts of healthy fats and some dairy.

Building balanced meals

Looking for delicious diabetes-friendly recipe ideas? Check out our free Sweet Life Pick n Pay Diabetes Cookbook!

This information was brought to you by www.picknpay.co.za

Pick n Pay is committed to promoting health and wellbeing among South Africans and employs the services of a registered dietician to provide food and nutrition related advice to the public. For your nutrition and health related queries, contact healthhotline@pnp.co.za or toll free on 0800 11 22 88

For more fantastic information on diabetes and nutrition, visit Pick n Pay’s Health Corner.

 

Photo by Anna Pelzer on Unsplash

Diabetic-friendly energy drinks?

Are you a sportsperson with diabetes? Do you have any advice to share with Mike about energy drinks?

Good day,

I am a Type 2 diabetic who enjoys cycling. I’m looking for advice on energy drinks or sports drinks etc that are diabetic-friendly.

Just drinking water doesn’t help when the energy dips…

Thank you!

– Mike