diabetes burnout

An honest take on Type 1 diabetes

I’d like to introduce a new contributor to Sweet Life: one of my favourite Instagram feeds, Tracy Sanders. Also known as @type1tracy. Tracy has Type 1 diabetes, but that doesn’t stop her from doing anything in life… Check out what she has to say, below, on a solo trip to Italy.

type 1 diabetes tracy

H O N E S T Y 💭H O U R: Firstly, I just want to say whatever you want to do, whatever you dream of, or whatever adventure you seek. You can do it. With diabetes. Without diabetes.


Secondly, this isn’t an inspirational “Diabetes can’t stop you from living your dreams” message, let’s be potently honest, it sure as hell can. If you choose to passively sweep through this life ignoring diabetes, your body, it’s messages, type one will create walls and obstacles.


You have to be practical💪. You have to take charge💥. You have to apply yourself and take responsibility. Take on responsibility WITHOUT resentment. 🙏Without wishing otherwise, “I wish I didn’t have diabetes, I wish I could be lucky like my friends who don’t have to inject”. It is important to acknowledge these thoughts💭, be intensely curious about them and their origins, and let them go.

Taking responsibility does not mean aiming for perfection (it does not exist). It’s about refusing to let numbers define you🚫, putting effort 💪🏼into working FOR your numbers and looking after your mental health too: patience, self-love and kindness, forgiveness, gratitude.

Being alone in Italy, it dawned on me the kind of responsibility that I was carrying with me.🙈 If I had a low, the only person I could rely on was myself.

The thoughts of mid-sleep hypoglycemia developing into seizures did creep into my mind. 🤔I have never had such before, but this does not mean it’s not possible. It just means I better make 100% sure it doesn’t happen as there will be no one to run into my room to help me. Careful bolusing, dinner well before I sleep, glucose sweets🍬 always on hand & at my bedside. Small practicalities that make all the difference. But I had gelato🍦, I had pasta🍝, I skipped dinner, and ate until my tummy was bursting😂 I had some nasty BGs and a lot of good ones

Yes you can be free, you can explore, you can run that event, you can lower your HBA1C, you can have a beautiful healthy pregnancy. But you first need to have a RAW and HONEST conversation with yourself. How can you make a change, take charge and free yourself of any little bits of a victim mentality that can lurk in the setting of chronic disease?

‘Being diabetic is a gift’

I got this amazing email from one of our community members last week and had to share it. Would you like to share your story with the Sweet Life community? Email me – we’d love to hear it.

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What an absolute treat to read your magazine and continually refer to it.

I have been Type 1 diabetic for 14 years. As much of a roller coaster ride as it has been, I would not swop being diabetic for anything in the world.

The people you meet along this journey, the knowledge you gain about how your body functions and responds, the prior knowledge you get from high glucose readings before you get ill and a complete understanding of the people I meet who possibly battle with elevated glucose levels or hypoglycemia.

Being Type 1 diabetic makes you aware on every level – spirit, body, mind, soul, feelings, thoughts, allows for wise choices (although if not wise then the consequences that accompany these – you have actually just got to smile, knowing that this is within your control), tolerant and respectful of others.

It is without a doubt, a gift.

It is amazing how when you change your mindset and adopt an attitude of gratitude, how life truly shines in its full form.
Make no error, there are days when I sit on my kitchen floor and weep in frustration – as ‘for no reason’ my sugar levels are astronomically high (21.0) or scarily low (1.8) and then I do adopt the ‘oh woe is me’ and sob. Then when I’m done I get up and reconsider things with fresh eyes and chances are good I know what I have done wrong, or that my insulin pens are not working as they should or my change in hormones as I get older has added a new spin.
I have a diabetic friend who is wise, a mind blowingly phenomenal psychologist who practices the Demartini approach. At one of my ‘I can’t do this’ moments, she told me to get myself a journal and write down 200 reasons why I am grateful for the gift of having diabetes. Initially I balked at the mere thought – then when you get started you just keep going and smile as you write or nod like a lunatic. I am on 150 reasons and it’s been a couple of months – but I look back and reread these and then put one foot in front of the other again, with purpose.
– Lara

Dealing with diabetes burnout

“I’m worried that my wife is suffering from diabetes burnout. She seems exhausted by her condition and uninterested in getting it back under control. What can I do?” Simon Smith

Dear Simon,

Dealing with diabetes burnout is complex. There is no “one solution fits all” because the experience isn’t the same for everyone. Each person lives with diabetes in their own way, and needs different kinds of support. Burnout is often accompanied by stress, anxiety, depression and a host of emotional states like anger, resentment, shame and guilt.

A few ideas to help your wife work around her burnout are:

  • Allow her to feel “burned out”. If she tries to hide that emotion, it just makes it worse. Denial is not good for healing. Help her think of positive things about her diabetes. For example: “At least I am eating healthy.”
  • Nurture her. Spend quality time with her. Teach her to nurture herself.
  • Get her to slow down some things in her life. The idea is for her to have more breathing space in her life so that everything isn’t related to diabetes.
  • Sometimes it also helps if she changes her diabetes management. If she is using a pump, maybe she could go onto normal injections for a while. Or if she is injecting and this is getting her down, she could follow up the idea of using an insulin pump. Maybe wearing a continuous blood glucose monitor might help take the stress out of all the fingerpricks for a while.
  • Encourage her to connect with other people with diabetes so that she knows she isn’t alone.
  • Help her realise that she must not strive for perfection, and accept that fluctuations happen, even when she is trying her best.
  • Instead, focus on her victories: what she is doing right, even the small things. Then, set some achievable goals that build on those successes.
  • Together, try to identify the barriers she has in managing her diabetes. This will help both of you to decide what she needs to change to have better control over both her diabetes and getting rid of her burnout.

Always remember that your diabetes team is there to help you. Remind her that it is never about how you fall, but about how you get up.

– Jeannie Berg, Diabetes Educator