diabetes 1

Type 1 Diabetes and Breastfeeding

To all the diabetic mommies out there:

Being diabetic did you breastfeed your baby? I have found that my sugar dips from the breastfeeding.   think I should stop as I nearly went into a coma, when I came to my sugar was 0.5, but I don’t want to stress my baby out. She does not like taking a bottle from me at all.

The doctors and councilors all seem to have different opinions. I have been feeding my baby less and have now got spiking sugars, I assume from my body adjusting  again. I am very torn because my baby needs me more than my milk.

Has anyone else out there had the same situation?

Thanks,

Candace

A Fabulous Sugar Alternative

IMG_7025I don’t know about you, but sometimes I want something decadent to eat – despite being diabetic. I want a slice of cake with my cup of tea, especially if I’m celebrating with friends and family.

Of course, Sweet Life has always shared recipes for treats as well as ordinary food, because we believe that you can’t be on a diet your whole life, and diabetes is definitely sticking around for your whole life… But still, it made me feel guilty to use sugar in recipes when I know what sugar does to my blood sugar (bad, spiky things!)

That’s why I was so delighted to be given Natreen artificial sweetener to test out. I’ve always been a bit scared of artificial sweeteners because of aspartame, which has been linked to cancer, but Natreen doesn’t have any aspartame which makes me very happy! (Apparently the claims of aspartame being linked to cancer haven’t been proven, so it’s not something that they can shout about any more).

My next concern, though, was what replacing normal sugar with a sugar substitute would do – particularly while baking. I’m very happy to report that the result was exactly the same, and my non-diabetic friends didn’t even notice the difference! I made our special occasion Flourless Chocolate Tart and it was simply fabulous. Best of all, my blood sugar readings were heaps better than if there had been sugar in the cake. That’s because the sweeteners in Natreen (cyclamate and saccharin) don’t have any carbohydrate – as opposed to sugar, which is 100% carbohydrate. I actually asked for a breakdown so that you could see exactly what I was talking about – take a look below:

Calories:

  • 8 drops Natreen Liquid = 1 tsp sugar (4.2g)
  • 100ml Natreen Liquid = 0.96 calories
  • 1 tsp sugar (4.2g) = 16 calories
  • 100g sugar = 387 calories
  • 6.67ml Natreen Liquid = 100g sugar

Carbohydrates:

  • 100ml Natreen Liquid = 0g carbohydrates
  • 100g sugar = 100g carbohydrates

So for those special occasions when you really want something delicious and sweet, I would highly recommend using Natreen instead of sugar… Your blood sugar will thank you!

Diabetes Turned My Life Around

Hi everyone…

It’s so heartening to read all of the posts on your website and learn from all of your experiences! It has inspired me to share my story on your website.

I am a 40 year old Indian male. Two years ago (18 December 2013) to be exact, I had admitted my self to the Umhlanga Netcare hospital. I was just too tired, too run down and did not know what was going on with my body. I had started feeling tired, restless, sleep deprived a few days before. I was also very stressed out and emotionally down due to a lengthy divorce battle and being separated from my children. The doctor attending to me admitted me to ICU. I was undergoing a Type 1 Diabetic Keto Acedosis attack. I lay in hospital for a week. When I was finally discharged, my weight had dropped from around 85 kg to 68kg! I was totally insulin dependent, and was diagnosed as a Type 1 Diabetic at the age of 38.

My world seemed to be collapsing around me. First, the divorce/separation from my wife and kids (who mean the world to me), and now finally my health just failing me completely. I just could not cope with anything at that point in time.

Eventually I pulled myself together. I started off my new life by following my Insulin dosage instructions carefully, and by doing relentless research on Diabetes Type 1 and read up on everyting about Diabetes and related topics/posts/blogs etc. I learnt about a balanced Diabetes nutrition and and how to shop, prepare and eat food Diabetes Smart. I eat a low fat, controlled Low GI Carb Diet, with no refined/processed foods. I have developed an exercise routine that I follow religiously. My eating pattern, portion controls and diet have become a daily way of life now. Its embedded in my lifestyle.

When I was going through the Type 1 DKA attack, my blood Glucose was 27 mmol/l, my HbA1C at that time was 18.5 percent and Cholesterol 4.67 mmol/l. Since Dec 2013, I do HbA1c’s every 6 months, together with Cholesterol checks etc. My last two HbA1C’s were 4.90 and 5.10 mmol/l, and Cholesterol 3.67 mmol/l.

I believe that I have my condition under control, and firmly believe that I can still have a meaningful, productive life of good quality, if I maintain my Diabetes Care Routine.

Type 1 Diabetes does not have to be a death sentence, you can turn it in your favour by living and eating healthily and staying positive about your life.

Cheers for now everyone and happy, healthy living!

– Dhiraj

The Diabetes Dawn Phenomenon

Hi,

I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 20 years now.  Lately I am suffering horribly from the dawn phenomenon.  My sugar readings are perfect before bed, perfect at 03:00 am when I wake up to test, but absolutely sky high when I wake up in the mornings.

Has anyone experienced this and if so how can it be prevented?

Thank you.

– Frances

Tips for Weight Gain with Diabetes

Morning to you all,

I’m a Type 1 diabetic and have accepted this chronic condition well.

My only problem with it is a loss of weight. I never wanted to be slim ever in my life, but now there’s no way I can maintain my body to get it back to my normal weight.

Do you have any healthy weight gain tips?

Thanks,

– Thahtoow

No More Insulin from Local Clinics?

Hi there,

I was wondering if you could be so kind as to assist me in the following request.
My girlfriend has been a Type 1 diabetic for 23 years and she always collected her insulin from the local clinic.

Last month when she collected her insulin she was told that the government clinics don’t supply insulin anymore, since then it’s been a uphill battle to get insulin.

She doesn’t have medical aid at the moment and therefore we would appreciate it if you can refer us to someone or a clinic that’s able to help in this matter.

Hope to hear from you soon…

Kind Regards,

Giovani

Husband just diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes

Good day

Two weeks ago we just found out that my husband has diabetes Type 1. To be honest we were both in shock, especially when we read more about it, we knew it it a very serious disease. I think we are trying to accept and live with it positively but we are still scared and not sure what will happen as time goes.

We are reading more about it, because we need to know everything about it. It is not easy, especially if you don’t talk and think everything to yourself. The thing is we can’t just talk to anyone because most of people still do not understand out there. So we thought maybe joining Sweet life might help us heal and live positively again.

Thank you
– Nthabiseng

Type 1 diabetes tips

claudine leeThis month, we welcome a new member to our Panel of Experts – Dr. Claudine Lee, a GP from Hilton in KZN. Find out more about her (as well as the rest of the experts) here.

Here are a few tips from Dr. Lee on how to manage diabetes well – and what advantages insulin pump therapy offers. Let us know if you have any questions for her!

Top tips for Type 1 diabetes good blood sugar control :

  1. Regular exercise – one sure way to keep things controlled (it must be a way of life).
  2. Correct food choices in terms of carbs, especially portion size and dosing correctly to “mop up” the carbs without any lows.
  3. Knowing if you are more sensitive to insulin in the morning or evening and adjusting your dose in connection with that.
  4. Knowing your numbers and testing, if you don’t know where your sugar is at you can’t respond to it.
  5. Being on the correct insulin to match your lifestyle/meals/exercise.

Advantages of insulin pump therapy:

  1. Getting rid of hypoglycemia (lows) especially bad lows.
  2. One prick every 3 days.
  3. Basal rate of insulin matched specifically to you, less insulin used (thus better weight control).
  4. Bolusing for meals is extremely simple and aided to control sugars exactly.
  5. Better control = better wellbeing generally.
  6. For the young: you can decide impromptu to stay over at a friend/function as all you have for the next 3 days for your diabetes is on your person.

 

Just out of hospital…

Hello all you diabetics!

Firstly, I was diagnosed with Type-1 at the age of 4. I recently turned 31, so 27 years of insulin dependency and a happy, healthy life in general.

On 25 January ’14 I was rushed to hospital and diagnosed with DKA – I was in hospital for a total of 22 nights. I also contracted a fungal infection whilst in hospital then also had internal bleeding from my oesophagus because of this infection…. I know, super dramatic stuff!

My question is this: Has anyone else experienced the emotional instability after being released from hospital? Is this a diabetic thing or just my own mental problems…?

I’m crying for the most ridiculous things… Yesterday the laundromat advised me they couldn’t dry my clothes and I burst out crying. Its just not me – I didn’t even need the clothes :-)

What can I do?

Please help!

Adios,
Bonnie