communication

Mood swings in people with diabetes

What can you guys tell me about mood swings in Type 1s? Happy the one day, negative the next? What advice do you have for partners of diabetics on how to handle these mood changes?” Lynne van der Spuy

Dear Lynne,

Mood swings are common in people with diabetes for both emotional and physical reasons. Anger and anxiety are normal reactions when someone has a chronic condition: it’s a lot to cope with, and at times overwhelming. Problems with poor control can cause stress levels to climb, leading to a vicious cycle of high glucose levels and fear about managing the condition. In fact, the emotional impact of diabetes is so vast that the risk of depression is doubled.

Physically, when someone’s sugar spikes or drops, it can actually produce feelings of anger and anxiety that are really out of their control. It can also make it harder to concentrate and cause fatigue, which would make anyone feel down. Stressful situations alter the body’s management of glucose, which can result in unstable blood sugar, so you may notice that mood swings worsen.

How to handle a mood swing:

  • Communication is vital. Address the issue when your partner is in a good frame of mind.
  • Explain your frustration and say that you understand mood swings are part of diabetes, but that doesn’t make it any easier. Make sure you feel heard; that’s important for your emotional well-being!
  • Ask your partner to check blood sugar during a mood swing, and correct if necessary.
  • Try to stay calm and avoid getting drawn into a fight; walk away if you need to.
  • Long term: encourage good diabetic control, and think about seeing a counsellor if the emotional issues remain difficult.

– Jeannie Berg, Diabetes Educator