Tips & Advice

How to quit smoking if you have diabetes

how to quit smoking with diabetes

Our regular contributor Jane Sandwood tackles the topic of how to quit smoking if you have diabetes. Have you managed to quit smoking? Do you have any advice to share? Tell us your experiences, here or on Facebook, and it might help the rest of the South African diabetes community.

The health risks of smoking with diabetes

The health risks of smoking with diabetes are well documented; however, curbing nicotine addiction while managing your diabetes adds another layer of complexity to a notoriously difficult task. In South Africa, the prevalence of diabetes is increasingly rapidly, which in turn raises the stakes for smokers with diabetes to quit while controlling glucose levels. Because standard nicotine replacement options such as patches and e-cigarettes aren’t safe for diabetics, either, many are left with the daunting prospect of going cold turkey without a tangible removal plan. Fortunately, a range of treatment options exists for diabetics looking to quit smoking while managing their disease.

Early stages and treatment plans

Before quitting, smokers should consult their doctors to determine the best course of action. Because smoking suppresses appetite, some research suggests that diabetics who quit smoking struggle to control their blood sugar levels. As a result, individual diets may need adjustment to prepare for withdrawal from nicotine.  Doctors can work with patients to devise a schedule or pattern that best suits their needs.

Most smokers will attempt to quit dozens of times before they are successful. While some attempt to gradually wean themselves off cigarettes, others go “cold turkey” and quit all at once. Although individual results vary, some research suggests that smokers who quit “cold turkey” were more successful than those who quit gradually. At any rate, it’s important to remember that quitting smoking is a continual process, and not something that happens ‘all at once’–even if you can pinpoint your last cigarette to a specific day. It’s normal to have setbacks, and plenty of ex-smokers can attest to the efficacy of quitting cigarettes, even it takes more than one attempt.

Moving forward with quitting smoking

Normally, diabetics will be able to quickly observe improvements and results in their own health within weeks of quitting smoking, which can encourage efforts to absolve from nicotine. It is also a good idea to consult medically supported research on the trajectory of nicotine withdrawal to give you a broader sense of what’s happening to your body as you continue the process of nicotine withdrawal. It may also be a good plan to keep a journal logging changes in mood, diet, blood sugar level, and other related factors to track individual growth throughout the process.

Quitting smoking is a frightening prospect for anyone addicted to nicotine, least of all diabetics. However, many viable treatment plans exist to help curb nicotine in a manner that is effective and safe. It won’t take much time to benefit from the wide range of advantages to quitting smoking as you continue the ongoing process of diabetic care.

 

The best diabetes specialists in South Africa

We get one question on our Diabetic South Africans Facebook page every week: please can you recommend a diabetes specialist in (a certain city)?

And then we ask the diabetes community, and get amazing answers. So I thought it would be helpful to compile all of those answers in one place. If you’re looking for a diabetes specialist, take a look at the list below. I’ve included comments in italics when people had something specific to say. And if you have a diabetes specialist to recommend, please share! You can either comment on this page or on the Diabetic South Africans Facebook page.

These are all diabetic specialists recommended by the diabetes community – endocrinologists, doctors and a few diabetes educators.

Gauteng

 

Joburg diabetes specialists:

 

Dr Zaheer Bayat

Dr Sundeep Ruder

Dr Segal at Donald Gordon (Wits University Donald Gordon Medical Centre)

Prof Wing at Donald Gorden Institute – (011) 356-6000‬. Amazing. He changed my life 4 years ago!

Dr Adri Kok, Union Hospital, Alberton

CDE in Houghton – 011 712 6000‬
Fantastic facility! I’m under the superb control and guidance of Dr. Stanley Landau.
1) Doctors and endocrinologists.
2) Gym
3) Dieticians
4) Lancet Laboratory
5) Chemist
Doesn’t get much better than this!

Dr Mayet at CDE Houghton is a diabetologist, Dr David Segal specializes in paediatric diabetes.
Depends on whether you have medical aid or not. As a private patient the fees are less than for medical aids.
Dr Segal is a pediatric diabetic endocrinologist and excellent with children.

Dr Debbie Gordon at the Centre for Diabetes – 011 356 6040. She is absolutely amazing.

Dr Brian Kramer or Prof Larry Distiller.

Tabitha Hume is a really helpful registered dietician.

Dr Erasmus and associates in Benoni: Dr Erasmus is the best

Diabetic Clinic at Charlotte Maxeke Hospital 👏👌👌
Johannesburg Hospital (Charlotte Maxeke) has the best diabetic specialist in SA

Diabetic Educator Charlotte Meschede at Parkmore Medical Centre

Dr Reyneke at Life Springs Parkland

Dr Chiba at Clinton Hospital Alberton

Dr Andre Pieterse, Linksfield

Jen Whittal: diabetic educator in Bryanston – 083 441 5089.
She empowers you with choices to make wise decisions that truly have you smiling.

 

Centurion diabetes specialists:

Dr Wynand Jacobs near Unitas Centurion – he is the best!

 

Pretoria diabetes specialists:

 

Dr Jacobus van Dyk in Pretoria – the best ever

Dr Betsie Klopper in Pretoria/Hatfield.

Dr. Smit at Pretoria East Hospital

Dr Helena Oosthuizen at Pretoria East Hospital

 

Boksburg diabetes specialist:

 

Dr Coenie Venter, Healthworx in Boksburg

 

Mpumalanga

 

Secunda diabetes specialists:

 

Jeannie Berg is a diabetes educator at Kosmos Pharmacy

Dr Bahadur – 0176381253

 

Witbank diabetes specialists:

 

Dr Lombard and Kate Ratcliff at the Diabetic Clinic in Witbank – 013 697 2407

I have been with them for almost 8 years now and have got my HBA1C from 10.8 to 6.0. They arrange all your yearly appointments with Kate, the diabetic educator, the podiatrist, eye specialist and dietitian. You also see Dr Lombard every time you see the previously mentioned people. They have received awards with the medical association and are all just awesome!

 

KwaZulu/Natal

 

Durban diabetes specialists:

 

Dr Diab in the Kloof area (Highway Diabetes Centre – 031 7658741). Fantastic!

Dr Randeree at Parklands is an endocrinologist

Dr Pillay in Westville. He is a paediatric endocrinologist.

Dr Govender, Sedeshan Soobramoneyvery good specialist

Dr Jairam at Kingsway Hospital in Amanzimtoti. Very happy with him.

Dr Jo Skelton (endocrinologist) is incredible

Fiona Prins is a diabetic specialist par excellence

Dr Govender in Umhlunga

Julie Peacock is a Registered Dietitian practising in the Durban North, KZN area. She has lived with Type 1 diabetes for the last 43 years!

 

Pietermaritzburg diabetes specialists:

 

Dr Devan Gounder based at Netcare St Anne’s Medical Centre

Dr A.Y.D. Moosa – 033 3456222. He is also the MD of Midlands Medical Hospital in Pietermaritzburg. He is brilliant!

Dr Russel Kirkby

Kate Bristow is an excellent diabetes educator

 

Hilton diabetes specialist:

 

Dr Claudine Lee in Hilton

 

Free State

 

Welkom diabetes specialist:

Dr. Colyn: Internist at MediClinic Welkom

 

Eastern Cape

 

Port Elizabeth diabetes specialist:

 

Dr Greg Hough

 

East London diabetes specialist:

 

Dr Sean Murray

Unathi Daweti: diabetes nurse educator
She is the best…

 

Western Cape

 

Cape Town diabetes specialists:

 

Prof Joel Dave

Dr Neville Wellington

Dr Hennie Nortje – N1 City Medical Chambers – 021 595 0922/3

Prof Francois Bonnici, UCT Hospital

Tygerberg Hospital
It is a referral hospital but has an amazing team in Endocrinology. Prof Zollner is amazing!

Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital
Also popular with those of us with no medical aid!

Tracy Ugarchund, dietician with a special interest in diabetes: Constantiaberg Mediclinic

 

 

Lifestyle changes to manage Type 2 diabetes

It’s one of the questions we get asked at Sweet Life all the time. Do I have to change my lifestyle – and my diet – to manage Type 2 diabetes?

diabetes diet

Lifestyle disease

Well, that depends. Most of the time, Type 2 diabetes is caused directly or indirectly by issues of diet and lifestyle – it’s sometimes called a ‘lifestyle disease’. That said, there is a strong genetic component, so it’s not helpful to think that you ‘gave yourself diabetes’. That kind of attitude isn’t going to help you live a healthy, happy life with diabetes.

Take a close look at your lifestyle. Do you think it’s one of the reasons you were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes? Do you eat a lot of fried, fatty food? Is there enough fresh fruit and vegetables in your diet? Do you eat a lot of processed food or refined carbohydrates? Do you eat large portions, even if you’re no longer hungry? If so, it might be time for a lifestyle revamp. Take a look at Sweet Life’s Ask the Dietician articles for advice on a healthy diabetes diet.

Family with diabetes

One of the hardest things for newly diagnosed diabetics is making the changes necessary for their health, while still being part of the family. For many people, family meals are an important part of the day, and having to either eat a different variety of a meal or eat at different times or in a different way (a plate of food instead of sharing from communal plates, for example) is a difficult adjustment. Some families are fantastic at supporting the newly diagnosed, others find it too much of a challenge. Sweet Life has written about the challenges of family life with diabetes in our Partner’s Corner articles – you can find out more about families with diabetes here.

Remember that it’s important to sit down and explain to your family why you need to make certain changes, and how they can benefit from them too. Those who have adopted a healthier lifestyle – one that’s rich in fresh food and regular exercise – not only see the effects in their blood sugar results, but in their overall wellbeing.

Have you had to change your lifestyle because of diabetes?

Photo by Dan Gold on Unsplash

 

Have a diabetes question? Ask us here!

There are some questions that only diabetics know how to ask – and answer… This is your space to ask any diabetes questions you like – and give answers to the rest of the community. After all, we’re all in this diabetes journey together!

Share your experience, your tips and advice, and your challenges with diabetes on this page.

diabetes question

Please bear in mind that any information shared here is from the diabetic community, and has not been supplied by a medical doctor. Don’t make any changes to your medication without first consulting a medical professional. That said, diabetes is a social condition, and we can all learn from each other as we strive towards better control.

Have a question?

Write an email, attach a photo (if you want to) and we’ll publish it here! Give as much information as you can about the issue and we’ll work through it together!

Diabetes question (an example!)

Subject: Eating curry sends my blood sugar up
Email: Every time I eat curry my blood sugar goes through the roof… Has anyone else experienced this? I’m eating chicken curry with naan and taking what I think is the right amount of insulin. By Joe Blog (www.yourwebsite.com)
Pics: If you want to add photos to your post, simply add them as an attachment in the email and we’ll put them up as part of your blog post.

Once your blog post is live, we’ll invite the rest of the community (particularly from Facebook) to join us in sharing advice.

Have a diabetes question? Let’s answer it!

The best (expert!) diabetic advice

What’s the one piece of advice all diabetics should listen to?

We asked our Panel of Experts… Here’s what they had to say:

diabetes advice

“Focus on the good-for-you foods you want to include in your diet, rather than the things you want to limit.”
Cheryl Meyer, Dietician.

“Make small changes to your diet that could bring about a bigger change in your health. Swap white bread for low GI bread, for example, and leave off the butter.”
Faaiza Paruk, Dietician.

“Exercising, keeping to the right BMI and eating a good diabetic diet are all essential because these factors determine the amount of medication you need. It’s also important not to smoke, to take your medication properly and to visit your doctor regularly.”
Dr. Joel Dave, Endocrinologist.

“Ask yourself: ‘Have I got diabetic retinopathy: Yes or No?’ The only way you can know that answer is if someone competent and trained has looked at your retina and given you the answer. So visit an ophthalmologist every year!”
Dr. Dale Harrison, Ophthalmologist.

“Always use a good diabetic foot cream. Examine your feet every day, especially if you have neuropathy. Check your shoes with your hands before you put them on to be sure there isn’t anything in them. Ensure your shoes fit properly and have enough space so that there are no pressure areas that could cause blisters or wounds.”
Andy Blecher, Podiatrist.

“Go to a qualified podiatrist for a thorough Diabetic Foot Assessment at least once a year. Ask questions and be informed.”
Anette Thompson, Podiatrist.

Any advice to add?

 

Toddler son just diagnosed with diabetes

From our community blog:

Hi there,
I am new to this site.

Last night I was at the casualty section of Wilgeheuwel Hospital in Joburg because my 2 year-8-month year old son has been very listless and vomited and I thought he probably had gastro. He was diagnosed about 2 hours ago with Type 1 diabetes and was taken straight to ICU to be stabilised and to have tests done.

This was an overwhelming, terrifying moment for me — I know very little about Type 1 Diabetes and my OCD thinking went into a tailspin about “what if he is in a situation one day where there is no insulin available and and and…”

Forgive me for sounding so panicked, but I am utterly at sea and trying to come to grips with the news. I am writing in the hope that someone can tell me everything’s going to be okay – that the ‘episodes’ or emergency situations will be able to be handled with confidence and success, and that (bar all the huge adaptations we’ll make to our lives), he will be okay.

I’d really appreciate any comfort anyone can give to this totally inexperienced, upset mom.
Thank you!
– Hayley
Comments:

Hi Hayley,
My son is also a diabetic. He was diagnosed at age 12, nearly 6 years ago. I just wanted to say: hang in there. Your child will be okay. He will one day be able to cope with this all. Just remember that this is not your fault. Nothing could have prevented this. Do join our group on Facebook: Kids powered by insulin. This group has helped me through some tough times.
Remember there is light at the end of the tunnel. Keep the faith. It will get better, that I promise.
Rachel

Hi Hayley,
All will be okay as long as you take care of it and treat it accordingly.
Keep monitoring your son’s diabetes and it will be fine!
Randy

Oh my, I know the feeling of absolute devastation! I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes three years ago at an oldish age, and I live alone, and thought the world had come to an end. Obviously for such a little one it is very difficult… I’m very aware of what I eat. Living with diabetes is difficult, but doable.
Lynn

The secret to a happy life with diabetes?

From Facebook (Diabetic South Africans):

What’s the secret to a happy life with diabetes?

To not make it an issue. Treat it and forget it. Life is too short.
Louis

Most people suffer some type of illness, but we all have to just deal with it and get on with our lives.
Erika

Sorry to all those optimistic people out there… but there is no happy life with diabetes 🙁
Lisa

Finding the right balance… While diabetes is not a good thing to have, one certainly does still have a happy life. Be informed… and that goes for your spouse and family members too.
Lynnae

Support and understanding from the people closest to you makes it easier to live with.
Adele

Yoga and diabetes

Yoga is not only a fantastic form of strengthening exercise, it’s also great for calming the mind – something most of us with diabetes need to do! Bridget McNulty finds out more.

As a diabetic, the one thing I hear over and over is that exercise is good for me. And it is! But sometimes exercise feels a bit too much like… well… hard work. Not so with yoga. I started doing yoga a few months ago and I’m totally hooked – it has just the right balance of strengthening, balancing and heart-racing poses, and I love that we get to meditate after each class. I asked yoga teacher Tasha Saha why she thinks yoga is particularly good for diabetics.

“As well as better fitness and cardiovascular health, yoga massages and stimulates the function of the internal organs, balances the endocrine system and has measurable effects on the release of stress hormones,” she says. “All of these are factors that affect blood sugar, so it’s no surprise that several major studies have shown that regularly doing yoga can significantly reduce blood sugar levels.” Another aspect of yoga that sets it apart from other exercise is that it increases body awareness, which makes it easier to maintain a healthy weight and to make wiser food choices.

But which yoga to choose? In general, hot yoga (Bikram) and flow yoga (Ashtanga) are more demanding, so it’s better to begin with a slower practice like Hatha or Iyengar. Some poses (especially those that are active in the abdominal area and lower back) are particularly good for diabetics because they target the pancreas, promoting better function and helping to lower blood sugar levels. “But a balanced yoga session will work holistically on every system in the body,” says Tasha, “as well as the mind and emotions too – lowering stress levels and helping the whole person towards balance.”

I can honestly say that my yoga practice has helped me feel not only stronger and fitter, but calmer and more able to take on the daily challenges of diabetes.

Want to give it a try? Many yoga studios offer free trial periods or classes to beginners. Most gyms also offer yoga classes at a fraction of the price of private classes.

Find a yoga teacher in your area
Or visit Tasha Saha

Reflexology and diabetes

Bridget McNulty finds out what reflexology is all about, and if there’s any chance it can help those with diabetes.

Before I went for a reflexology session, I didn’t know much about it. I knew it was more than a foot massage, but didn’t really see how pressing a few points on my feet could affect my health and wellness.

Reflexology, it turns out, is a therapy that uses specific finger, thumb and hand pressure techniques on the different reflex areas, or zones of the feet, to correlate with different organs of the body. A reflexologist can tell you a lot about your body by feeling for congestion and imbalances in the feet, which show up as tightness, sensitivity or grainy areas. They can also ‘read’ the feet: the shape of the feet, the valleys and peaks, and how they respond to pressure.

The South African Reflexology Society has been recognized by the medical profession, and all reflexologists have to register with the Allied Health Professions Council. But what does a reflexology session actually feel like? Well, at first it is a little uncomfortable. The therapist looks for areas of tension or imbalance, and these are rubbed or pressed until they loosen. It’s like having a really firm massage: not painful, but not necessarily soothing. It is deeply relaxing, though, an hour of having your feet worked on feels like a few hours of sleep, and Lulu Beyers, the therapist I went to, says she has a lot of insomniacs as patients!

Reflexology, like most alternative therapies, has to be given on a regular basis to really see the results and changes in the body – the changes are slow but can be very positive, especially when it comes to treating complications of diabetes, like numbness in the feet. There have been a number of studies done on diabetes and reflexology (including self-reflexology, like the example below). The studies are mainly in Korea and China, as reflexology is an accepted form of healing in the East. (It began in 2330BC in Egypt, then spread to India, and from there to China and Japan.) Many of these studies show that reflexology is helpful in improving peripheral neuropathy, especially tingling sensation and pain, as well as slightly lowering blood sugar – perhaps due to a reduction in stress from the relaxing nature of the treatments – and an improvement in fatigue and mood.

Whether this is because of the nurturing nature of the treatments, an improvement in blood circulation from the massaging movements of reflexology or because of the endocrine system (especially the pancreas) being activated through pressure points is still to be discovered. But there is certainly no harm in having reflexology as part of your diabetes programme. Think of it as putting your feet up on the diabetic table, made up of the right medication, a healthy diet and regular exercise.

Try out this simple self-reflexology at home:

Press on each of these glands of the endocrine system (pictured below) with the base of a ball point pen for a few minutes at least once a week.

Ask the expert: Andy Blecher, podiatrist

“In my opinion, having time out to put your feet up and have them massaged can be good for your overall wellbeing – and if there’s some evidence that it helps with circulation and peripheral neuropathy in diabetics then patients should give it a try.”

Find a reflexologist in your area: www.sareflexology.org.za
Or visit Lulu Beyers in Cape Town: www.white-lotus.co.za

Reiki and diabetes

Bridget McNulty goes for a reiki session to see what it can do for diabetics.

At first glance, reiki seems a little odd. How can it possibly help to have someone wave their hands over your body? What could this do for diabetes, really? But if you put your doubts aside for a minute, the effects of reiki can be quite profound.

To understand what reiki is, think back to the last time you stood in line at the bank, and someone came up behind you. Even though you couldn’t see the person, you could sense that they were in your space. This space is your energy field, and just like your body, the energy field becomes blocked from physical, emotional and mental experiences. These blockages can cause you to feel ill, or tired, or depressed – they literally block the flow of energy in your body. Reiki helps to unblock the energy field, which in turn unblocks the body.

So what does it feel like? Deeply relaxing. A reiki session generally begins with a conversation about whatever is bothering you, and then moves to the treatment, where you lie down and the healer moves their hands over your body. You’re fully clothed at all times, and while there may be some light pressing of the hands, it’s not a massage. Some people feel heat coming from the healer’s hands, others just feel relaxed and sometimes even sleepy. It is completely non-intrusive and actually very pleasant.

But what can it do for diabetes? That’s what I asked Debbie Caknis, the reiki healer I visited. “Reiki can help people with diabetes as historically it has been known to heal on the physical, emotional and mental levels of the personality,” she explained. “Therefore disease (or dis-ease, because the body is not at ease) is addressed on many different levels.” It’s not only a physical healing – emotionally you can begin healing stuck energy, and mentally you can learn how to cope with the management of the condition in a more positive way. “Reiki helps people to get to know their bodies and be able to respond to ailments in a conscious manner,” says Debbie.

What’s interesting here is the focus not just on the physical side of the condition, but also on the emotional and mental side. As all diabetics know, there’s a lot more to managing diabetes than just taking your medication, eating right and exercise. Reiki helped me to see my emotions around diabetes in a clearer way, and understand why I react the way I do to high and low blood sugar. It also took away a lot of stress, and we all know how badly stress affects blood sugar.

I left the session feeling calmer, more on top of my condition, and with a burst of fresh energy. In short, I was quite amazed what healing hands can do.

Want to give it a try? Go for a reiki session, or do a once-off course that enables you to do your own treatments at home.

Ask the expert: Ruth Scott, psychologist

“While it is easy to feel overwhelmed by all the treatment options out there claiming to ‘heal’ you, many forms of alternative therapy can really help to calm the mind and therefore relax the body. How you feel about your treatment is almost as important as the treatment itself.”

Find a Reiki healer in your area: www.reikihealing.co.za
Or visit Debbie Caknis in Cape Town: www.zeropointhealing.co.za

Advice for parents of Type 1 diabetic kids

From Facebook (Diabetic South Africans):

Belinda wants to know if there are any parents of Type 1 diabetic kids out there… Want to share advice?

Some advice: the treatment of diabetes is not a perfect science. What works for one person may not work for the next. You need to make notes of what works for your child. This will take much of the guess work out of controlling your child’s blood sugar.
Wayne

Allow your kids to have a say and let them see the effects. Never wrap them in cottonwool! Let them live, learn and experiment!
Isabella

Hi. I’m also new to this. My little girl was diagnosed in May. She’s 2 and a half. Very scary and completely heart breaking often.
Kerry

Hi Belinda – join Kids Powered by Insulin if you haven’t yet. You’ll get good advice and support there. My son is 15 – diagnosed when he was 13. A good endo and educator, healthy diet and an understanding of how much insulin is needed and how each insulin works has helped us a lot so far. Take care x
Natasia

Hi there my daughter is 3 years old and Type 1 diabetic, she was diagnosed last year two weeks before her 2nd birthday.
Anthea

Belinda there are LOTS of us – join the Facebook group Kids Powered by Insulin.
Tiffany

Never tell them they can’t do something because of diabetes. As a child, I was told that I can’t do many things because of my diabetes – I missed out on a lot.
Elmarie

My daughter is 9 years old now and was diagnosed when she was 4. I would love to help anyone who has had to endure diagnosis – it was 3 months of pure hell and would have loved a shoulder to cry on or some tips to help.
Georgina

Thank you everybody for the reply. I am feeling much better that there are so many parents that are prepared to give me advice!
Belinda

Advice for a newly diagnosed diabetic

From Facebook (Diabetic South Africans):
What advice would you give a newly diagnosed diabetic?

Get as much info as you can. Prepare to make lifestyle change. Respect the illness and it won’t control you

Heidi

Don’t think you are any different from any other human. Carry on and enjoy yourself: everything in moderation. Exercise a lot and eat well – no problem!

Craig

Vat een dag op ‘n slag. eet gesond en doen oefeninge. en als wat ‘n nie-diabeet doen kan diabete ook doen!

Magrietha

Cut out anything white (sugar, flour, bread, chips, etc) and start an exercise program.

Brenda

Don’t dwell on it too much. My Type 1 diabetic son of 8 understands his illness yet just gets on with life. He is a happy child and a true inspiration to the people around him.

Wayne

Relax – it’s not the end of the world. It can be so overwhelming at first, but remember you have a manageable condition (note, not disease) God bless you!

Jashika

5 minutes with Bongi Ngema-Zuma

We chat to Bongi Ngema-Zuma, First Lady and founder of the Bongi Ngema-Zuma Foundation.

  1. Why did you start the Bongi Ngema-Zuma Foundation?

    It has always been my ambition to do something like that – I never came across anybody who told me about diabetes as a child, even when I was at school. But when you speak about it you find that each and every family is affected by diabetes in some way.

  2. How did your mother find out she was diabetic?

    My mother was not an educated woman, she was a housewife and only went to school up to Std 4. First she was told she had hypertension and received treatment for that. And then they investigated further and found out she had diabetes. Many people have had this happen – the underlying factor is diabetes. That’s why I encourage people to actively check their blood sugar. Whenever you go to the clinic you should get tested. What I learned from my mother is that changing her lifestyle made her live healthier and longer. She took every little lesson she could from the clinic – you eat like this, you don’t eat like that, you take your tablets, you eat so many times a day. What made it easier for her is that she made the whole family eat like that.

  3. What makes your life sweet?

    What makes me happy is chatting to people. I like getting people’s opinions on things, I like listening to people’s stories and visiting new places where I can learn new things.

Find out more about the Bongi Ngema-Zuma Foundation here.

 

Can’t get blood sugar down?

From our community blog:

Hi!
I wonder if anyone can advise me. I’m 27 (soon to be 28) and was diagnosed as a Type 2 diabetic in 2010. When I lived in South Africa, my average blood glucose would read between 5-7 and I would have occasional episodes of hypoglycemia.

Since I moved to South Korea, I have had the opposite problem. My reading first thing in the morning before breakfast is 10-14! I eat special K cereal with skimmed milk diluted with water for breakfast, a garden salad with no dressing for lunch and an average meal for dinner. I take Metformin 500 twice a day (I’ve been on that dose since I was diagnosed) and exercise regularly but I can’t seem to drop my blood glucose to within healthy levels.

I can’t really seek medical help because with my job, I can be deported if they find out I’m diabetic.

How can I get my blood sugar down?

– Kerissa

Comments:

Hi Kerissa, Just wondering if you eat snacks in between your meals as well? My dietician has me eat 7 times a day. Here are my thoughts:

  1. Find a doctor that specialises in diabetes, you might need your medication changed. I was been diagnosed in August 2012 with diabetes, my medicine has changed since and now I’m on both metformin and insulin.
  2. As far as I know, special K is a no-no for cereal. Rather eat oats with an apple.

Make a change in your breakfast and see if that helps. Then test 7 times through the day for 2 days and take that to your doctor’s appointment.

Hope you can get it under control. I battle sometimes too, you are not alone!

Elrica

Hi Kerissa,

I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 11 years now, so I can give you some input. Good carbs as far as I know (low GI) are: oats not Oats So Easy, brown rice, sweet potato, rye bread, brown rice cakes. Healthy fats are good for your joints and lowering the GI of a meal or snack (fish oil/omega 3 oil, 30g of almonds, quarter avocado). Good proteins are handy for maintaining muscles. Don’t forget to drink sufficient amounts of water daily to stay hydrated.

Morne

Crazy blood sugar fluctuations?

From our community blog:

Good morning,

I am in urgent need of assistance to help me get my diabetes / blood sugar levels in control and I’m actually almost on the brink of losing it… I’m struggling with sky high sugar levels and very low sugar levels, but it’s never between 4 and 6, it’s either lower, very low, or very-very high! I don’t know what to do anymore…

Please give me some advice. I am 28 years old, and have been diabetic since I was 9 years old.

Please help!

– Vasti

Comments:

Do not give up. If you are in a position to visit a Provincial Hospital do so. I want you to see a doctor please, for expert advice, as you need to undergo tests.
Krish

Dear Vasti
Sorry to hear that you are struggling with your diabetes. It is difficult to know how to help unless I have some information about types, doses and frequency of injections as well as some glucose values. You need to test and establish a pattern as to when the problems occur and in relation to what. Blood sugars that swing up and down cause more problems than those that are more stable. I suggest you establish a testing profile and then post again.
Regards
Lyn

Hi Vasti,

I have been a diabetic for 9 years as well and I am also 28 years old. You need to take a look at your diet and your lifestyle. From your email you sound like you are under a lot of stress and that is not helping your diabetes. With your sugar levels being so out of control your moods get affected badly. So strange how sugar levels have this effect on us but very true. You need to eliminate as much stress from your life as you can. You can get back to where you need to be as long as you take the day by day steps.

Your eating is very very very important and if you can try to exercise you must. When I was first diagnosed mine used to sit in the 30′s NOT GOOD! But now I am between 5-8 most days. I know that there are days when it is hard to keep your sugar levels under control but YOU CAN DO IT!

Please let me know if I can help with anything!
Thanks
Angela