Howza’s life with diabetes

Howza’s life with diabetes

Musician, actor and Type 1 diabetic – we find out how Howza fits it all in.

How long have you been diabetic?

Since 2003: I was 21 at the time. I was actually introduced to diabetes from a very young age because my father had Type 2 diabetes, but I was very ignorant – I didn’t know what it was until I got it. But I think the younger you are, the easier it is to adapt your life.

What was your diagnosis like?

You know, all the symptoms kicked in – loss of weight in a very short space of time, dehydration, constantly going to the toilet. I didn’t understand what was going on. When you lose weight like that you instantly associate it with HIV/AIDS, because there’s so much awareness of that. So obviously I panicked… But I did the responsible thing and went to the doctor – that’s when I found out I was diabetic. I wasn’t exactly relieved, the doctors put the fear of God in me by telling me all the things that could happen to me. It was hard to come to terms with…. But I was scared, and I was willing to turn my life around for the sake of living longer.

What’s the biggest challenge of living with diabetes?

Obviously diet and exercising. I was saying to my wife the other day, as much as I enjoy going to gym, it’s never easy. You need to find a way to motivate yourself to go to gym 3 or 4 times a week – self-motivation is important to live a healthy life. Nobody likes gym, in all honesty! But at the end of the day, when you put your mind to it, you’ll end up enjoying it.

I used to live a very unhealthy lifestyle – eating fast food and drinking every day. That had to change. I’m not saying be a health nut, but you need to find a way to do things moderately. If you’re going to drink, you need to drink responsibly and be aware of your sugar levels. I decided, instead, to stop drinking. But it was difficult for my friends to understand – you’re not drinking, so all of a sudden you’ve become a priest! It wasn’t easy, trust me, that was the most difficult part, especially as a youth. But at the end of the day I became selfish and told myself, “It’s not about them, it’s about me.” If I don’t take care of myself, they’ll still be cool – I won’t.

What advice would you offer to other diabetics?

I always say to people – look, I’m living with it, it’s not the end of the world. As cliché as that might sound, that’s the actual truth. I’m living a healthy, normal life with diabetes. Like I said, I don’t want to put myself on a pedestal and act like I’m perfect. I have my challenges. So when I speak to the youth I try to be as open and truthful as I can, so that they can relate. At the end of the day, the bottom line is that you have to be responsible for your own life.

What makes your life sweet?

My daughter, Tumelo.

Get in touch with Howza: @Howza_SA on Twitter

Posted on: September 6, 2017Editor

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *