Diabetic superfoods

Diabetic superfoods

Ask the dietician: Cheryl Meyer

From our community: “Sometimes it feels like I’m constantly trying to juggle what I want to eat and what I should be eating. Are there certain foods I must include in my diet because I’m diabetic?” Gracie Monaheng

The term “superfood” has become very popular in the language of food and health. We know that Mother Nature offers a wonderful selection of healthy foods, but research has yet to prove any of them magical. No single food, no matter how “super,” can take the place of the important combination of nutrients from a diet based on a variety of nutritious foods, including plenty of fruits and vegetables.

Some tests to help you decide whether a certain food is worth trying:

  • How does it taste? No food is worth eating if it doesn’t taste good. There are plenty of options to choose from that offer both health benefits and flavour.
  • Where was it grown? Has it had to travel long distances from where it was grown to where it was sold?
  • How much does it cost? Has its “super” title brought with it a “super” price tag?
  • Has it been researched? Check with your healthcare team.
  • What value does it add to my overall diet? Variety is an important measure of diet quality, but bear in mind that adding variety doesn’t necessarily mean trying wildly new things: even just a slight change can wake up your taste buds.

Think positive when planning your diet — focusing on foods to add, rather than avoid. Aim to include*:

  1. Omega-3 rich foods: like salmon, mackerel, pilchards, tuna, canola oil, flaxseed oil, flaxseeds and walnuts.
  2. Leafy green vegetables: like spinach, kale, lettuce and bok choi. These powerhouse foods are low in kilojoules and total carbohydrate.
  3. Wholegrains: easily trump their paler, refined counterparts. Choose brown or wholewheat options for a source of protein, fibre and B vitamins.
  4. Berries: sweet, yet low in calories and packed with antioxidants, vitamins and fibre.
  5. Nuts: plenty of flavour, very versatile and with a good dose of fibre and selenium. Although they are high in fat and calories, a few nuts go a long way to adding taste to all kinds of meals.
  6. Legumes: delicious, low in fat, high in fibre and rich in protein.

*As with all foods, you need to work these into your individual meal plan in appropriate portions.

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