10 Fast facts about neuropathy

10 Fast facts about neuropathy

One of the most common complications of uncontrolled diabetes is diabetic neuropathy – but do you know what it is? Here are the basics of what it is, how to avoid it, and how to treat it if necessary.

  1. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes.
  2. Neuropathy is short for “peripheral neuropathy” which means nerve damage in the peripheral nervous system.
  3. The peripheral nervous system includes all the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, and connects the central nervous system to the hands, legs and organs.
  4. Diabetic neuropathy is caused from damage to the small blood vessels that supply the nerves.
  5. Blood vessels are damaged by high blood glucose levels, having diabetes for many years and abnormal blood fat levels.
  6. Smoking and excessive alcohol use can also cause diabetic neuropathy, as can mechanical injury to the nerves (like carpal tunnel syndrome).
  7. Symptoms can include numbness and tingling in the hands and feet, erectile dysfunction, dizziness, muscle weakness and changes in vision.
  8. Some common signs of peripheral neuropathy are sharp, jabbing pain that may get worse at night, and pain when walking.
  9. Diabetic neuropathy can’t be cured, but there are treatments to help the symptoms.
  10. The best treatment for neuropathy is good blood sugar control, which will prevent the condition from getting any worse.
Posted on: February 15, 2018__Sweet Life__

3 thoughts on “10 Fast facts about neuropathy

  1. I am t2 an have been diagnosed with diabetic neuropathy
    the pain in my back and legs is unbearable.
    On Tegretol cr 300 for the past 7 days and praying for the promised relief.
    blood sugars seem to be under control for this week at least. …
    thanks for the information

  2. I just ordered steel insoles as suggested by my doctor for painful arthritis in my feet. The ordering process was quick and easy. The price for the insoles ($37.97) was high for what it is, just two thin pieces of steel shaped like a foot and covered with fabric; they slip inside my shoes. The fabric adhesive on the steel insole came loose at one spot on the edge of the heel, after wearing them just a few times. That will definitely be a problem if it continues to loosen, because it becomes sticky. The insoles do seem to help somewhat. They do not alleviate my foot pain completely, but orthofeet do help.

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